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Bodmin Moor Cornwall

View over the Moors - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
View over the Moors
Distant view - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Distant view
Moorland View - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Moorland View
River on the Moor - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
River on the Moor
Granite Outcrops - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Granite Outcrops
Moorland View - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Moorland View
Looking Across to Rough Tor - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Looking Across to Rough Tor
Drier Summer - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Drier Summer
De Lank River - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
De Lank River
Clapper Bridge - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Clapper Bridge
Delphi Bridge - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Delphi Bridge
Grazing Ponies - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Grazing Ponies
Changing Weather - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Changing Weather
Piles of Rocks - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Piles of Rocks
given to the National Trust - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
given to the National Trust
View across to the Reservoir - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
View across to the Reservoir
Clapper Bridge - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Clapper Bridge
Dark Clouds and Ponies - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Dark Clouds and Ponies
Ponies on the Moor - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Ponies on the Moor
Moorland Weather - Bodmin Moor Cornwall photos
Moorland Weather

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About Bodmin Moor Cornwall.

Bodmin Moor is a relativley small granite moorland in northeastern Cornwall measuring about 10 miles by 10 miles. Rolling moorland is puncuated with dramatic granite tors, the highest point on the moor is Brown Willy at 1378 ft it is also the highest point in Cornwall. The buildings and relics on the moor all refelct their granite origins, the cottages, farms and hedges along with the standing stones, burial chambers and clapper bridges have all come from rocks cleared from the moor..
For well over a thousand years the moor has been used as common land to graze livestock in the summer. The origins of common land rights stretch back in history to medieval times when these rights were strictly regulated and land owners appointed officials known as Reeves to check abuses. Apart from the right to graze livestock some of the more ancient rights covered are, Turbary which is the right to take turf for fuel for domestic use. Estovers which is the right to take underwood or branches and sand, gravel or stone for use in the commoners buildings and another common right was called Pannage which is the right to allow pigs to eat acorns and beech mast.
Like many parts of Cornwall the moor is alive with myths, ghosts and legends and the so called beast of Bodmin Moor has been spotted more than 60 times since its first sighting in 1983. Video footage shows a big cat which is black and some three and a half feet in length. An enquiry by the government found no evidence of such a creature but many locals remain convinced that one or more big cats are at large on the moors.

Photographic Print / Prints of Bodmin Moor